Archive for Web site

The return of Pig in a Poke — live online today!

Posted in All posts, On writing, Pig in a Poke with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 1, 2010 by Trina

Big news today for fans of good writing!

Pig in a poke

Pig in a Poke magazine

I’m proud to announce that for the first time in decades, Pig in a Poke magazine is going to live again today, May 1st, 2010!

This was a team effort. I am happy to the second half of the team. My husband Harry Calhoun created the magazine from an earlier print version he published back in the 1980s. Then, he edited a magazine called Pig in a Poke and, when he ran short of money, its smaller, more affordably priced offshoot, Pig in a Pamphlet. (See Harry’s blog for details). This online literary journal offers what we think to be an incredible lineup of poetry and fiction, with a few essays too.

For my part, I edited the fiction and took a crash course (self taught) in Web design to create the look of the site. Harry and I worked together to develop the look we wanted … it allows you to spend time with the individual writers in their own intimate spaces. I’m really proud of what we’ve accomplished.

It’s a tribute to the quality and staying power of our writers that Harry was publishing some of them back in the 1980s … as long ago as 1982, in fact. And we have some newer talent that I think is equally impressive. And by the way, any poets or fiction writers on this mailing list are more than welcome to submit for future issues.

I hope you’ll drop by, give a read, maybe donate to the cause, and let me know what you think.

http://www.piginpoke.com/currentissue.html

The lineup for this issue includes:

Poetry by

Jim Daniels

Louis McKee

Lyn Lifshin

Howie Good

Christopher Cunningham

William Doreski

David Barker

Carol Lynn Grellas

Robin Stratton

Alan Catlin

Karla Huston

Corey Mesler

Donal Mahoney

Shirley Allard

Fiction by:

Burgess Needle

Sharmagne Leland-St. John

Daniel Davis

Marjorie Petesch

Anne Woodman

Ginny Swart

James Neenan

Essays by:

James Heller Levinson

Anne Woodman

Some well-knowns, some unknowns, but all, I assure you, quality stuff. Drop in and wallow a while in the Pig sty … it’s not a bad place to be!

Who owns trinaallen.com?

Posted in All posts, On writing with tags , , , , , , , , on August 19, 2008 by Trina

This morning, I received this e-mail:

Dear owner of trinaallen.com,

I noticeded that your domain “trinaallen.com” expires in a few weeks, which means that it is going to be publicly available soon. I’d like to buy this domain name before it expires.

I assume that you are not interested in keeping it for yourself.

I can buy this domain for $60 plus any renewal related expenses. What do you think?

Stan Nonin,
stan_nonin@blueridgehosting.com

I’m not sure how many hits this spam will actually get with the misspelling of the second word. But, since this is the second time someone has sent me a spam about my domain name, see previous post., it got me thinking. Do I own my domain name? I should know that since I have a Web site. Feeling a little embarrassed, I decided to do some reading about domain names. This is what I learned.

A domain name is part of an Internet address. For example, google.com, howstuffworks.com, epa.gov, army.mil, stanford.edu.

A URL, or Uniform Resource Locator, is an Internet address that contains the domain name. It must include information to the left of the domain name, identifying the correct Internet protocol. Listed are some common protocol identifiers: http://, ftp://, and mail:.

For example, the domain name for my web site is: trinaallen.com. The URL for my web site is: http://www.trinaallen.com

How Stuff Works has several articles that I found helpful:

Because all of the names in a given domain need to be unique, there has to be a single entity that controls the list and makes sure no duplicates arise. For example, the COM domain cannot contain any duplicate names, and a company called Network Solutions is in charge of maintaining this list. When you register a domain name, it goes through one of several dozen registrars who work with Network Solutions to add names to the list. Network Solutions, in turn, keeps a central database known as the whois database that contains information about the owner and name servers for each domain.

So, after doing a little research, I learned that I own the domain name trinaallen.com. My domain name registrar is Yahoo!’s domain registration partner, Melbourne IT. They are responsible for maintaining my domain registration records and managing my domain renewals.

I also learned that anyone can go find information about any domain currently in existence at either of these two sites: http://www.betterwhois.com or http://www.networksolutions.com/whois/index.jsp. Anyone with an internet connection has access to the registrar’s administrative, technical, and billing contact information.

So, I made my domain information private in the hopes that spammers will have a harder time finding me. Now the contact information for Melbourne IT is listed in place of my contact information in the public WHOIS database.

I was also rather taken aback discover that anyone with an Internet connection can see who links to my site, my traffic, and what the site used to look like as far back as 2004. All the articles and stories that I thought I’d deleted can be viewed there. How scary and embarrassing. It is a lesson that you can’t undo what you post on the Internet.

Domain Registry of America Scam

Posted in All posts, Life with tags , , , , , , , , on April 11, 2008 by Trina

This post is a warning for anyone with a Web site. I received a deceptive notice yesterday from Domain Registry of America (DRoA). See image below. It made me so angry that I had to write this post about DRoA. The notice came by snail mail in an envelope with my correct name and address–which really ticked me off–and included a return envelope for payment. The notice looks like a bill and was written to scare me into changing my domain name registry: “You must renew your domain name to retain exclusive rights to it on the Web, and now is the time to transfer and renew your name from your current Registrar to the Domain Registry of America. Failure to renew your domain name by the expiration date may result in a loss of your online identify…”

I went to the Web site given in the letter: http://www.droa.com to find that the company offers “free” Web hosting for the lifetime of your domain. Free indeed! You can register your domain for only $30 for a year, with the rate adjusted to save if you sign up for three to five years. It is a scam. A scam that 50,000 Canadians fell prey to in 2003.

I learned from The Register that following an investigation by The Federal Trade commission, Domain Registry of America based in Ontario, Canada, was prohibited from making misrepresentations in the marketing of its domain name registration. Well DRoA is up to its old tricks and they obviously have my address.

There is no need for me to renew my domain name, and certainly not with DRoA. I have a Geocities Web site hosted by Yahoo. I pay a small monthly fee, but you can build a Web site for free through Yahoo with no need to pay for registering the domain name. Other sites offer similar free sites. I have no intention of switching. But this trick probably works quite well with people who have no clue how the Domain Name System (DNS) works.

DRoA have been fooling people since at least 2002, as the Domain Registry of America, of Canada, of Europe and of Australia. They’ve also used the names Yellowbusiness.ca, Internet Registry of Canada, Domain Registry Services, and Registration Services Incorporated. There is even a site dedicated to “inform internet users of the continuing saga of ‘Registration Services Incoporated'”.

According to the site this company first started sending out fake domain renewal letters to domain holders, using information illegally harvested from various WHOIS databases (mainly the Tucows OpenSRS database) in 2002.
The DRoA Web site lists contact addresses for them in North America, England, and Australia.

Signs you are a blogoholic

Posted in All posts, Life, On writing with tags , , on August 21, 2007 by Trina

I was updating my Web site this weekend and as I modified my “works in progress” page, it occurred to me that I needed include writing this blog as part of my “works in progress.” Blogging takes up much of my time and has contributed to keeping me from finishing my young adult novel.

Why? Blogging provides instant gratification — people see what I write immediately. There are no rejection letters and no waiting to get my work published. In contrast, when I work on my novel, I have nothing to show at the end of the day. The document sits in a file on my computer, read by no one but me. Sections of it may be brilliant, but parts are not ready for anyone to read. I’ll have to wait until it is finished and marketed out to an agent to see it in print.

Blogging is different. I can post in just a few minutes and read what other bloggers have to say in that same few minutes. It is a powerful addiction.

So here I sit with the notes for my young adult novel spread over my desk, with the document open to the chapter where I left off. But I find myself distracted and decide to write about spending too much time blogging. Meanwhile I haven’t touched my novel, haven’t moved the curser — it blinks, waiting.

Signs you are a blogoholic
1. You think to yourself, “Am I spending too much time blogging?” And then you blog about it.

2. You find yourself thinking, I can’t wait to blog about this, while brushing your teeth.

3. You can only keep track of which day it is by consulting your blog.

4. You have more blogger friends than real life friends.

5. You find yourself having amazing relationships with people in far-away places like Jakarta, Tasmania, and Scotland.

6. You meet new people, and really resent the lack of an “About” page attached to their forehead.

7. A friend tells you enthusiastically about their new blog and you cringe when they scribble down an address with “myspace” after the three w’s.

8. Your mother doesn’t call anymore, she just checks your blog.

9. Instead of chuckling at humor, you actually say “lol” outloud.

10. Your home computer has a serious hardware failure. You break out in a cold sweat and try to Google for a local repair place.

11. You walk around in a daze because you wouldn’t let something as insignifant as sleep interfere with your RSS feeds. (When you do go to bed you find yourself lying awake wondering if your server is connected).

12. You spend so much time doing blogging tasks that your “real writing” ends up falling by the wayside.

13. You get more “comment waiting for moderation” e-mail messages than spam.
14. Your lifetime goal is achieving a page rank of 10.

15. You keep a blog ideas notepad in your car and you write in it, putting your life in jeopardy on a daily basis.

16. You quit your day job because it is interfering with your blogging. (Money is so overrated).

17. You gain weight because you can’t get away from the computer long enough to do something as insignificant as going to the gym.

18. You clothes don’t fit, but you don’t shop for clothing because it will take away from your blogging time (you haven’t shopped for food anyway, so your clothes will soon fit).

19. Your first thought when you looked at your vacation pictures is which will look best on your post about your vacation.

20. You include ownership of your blog in your will.

21. You finish reading this and go make a post with your own additions.