Archive for poetry

Issue #3 of Pig in a Poke now alive and oinking!

Posted in All posts, On writing, Pig in a Poke with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on October 2, 2010 by Trina

Here we go again …

Pig in a Poke, issue #3, is live today … enjoy!

The third time’s a charm, and Pig in a Poke is charmed to be here. And we hope you’re charmed by the great lineup of poets (fiction writers and essayists) we have for you. I still can’t believe the amazing writers we’ve managed to attract, and Trina and I are grateful for that. As always, we try to put pearls of superb writing in our swinish sty. I think that once again we’ve put together a good mixture of poetry, fiction and some fine literary essays. Trina and I are proud to call this our magazine. A Pig in a Poke it is, because you might never know what you’re getting, but you know it’s going to be good.”  Harry Calhoun, editor.

Harry Calhoun, a.k.a. my husband, edits the poetry and I, a.k.a. Trina Allen, have picked out the stories and laid out the pages. The two of us have pretty much collaborated on choosing the essays.  Not only is there new talent here — new to the Pig, that is — but for this issue we asked several writers to submit stories including Christina Hoag, Lynne Barrett, Anne Woodman and Mark Howell.

I do hope you’ll drop by, give a read, spread the word, and maybe donate to the cause. Let me know what you think.

http://www.piginpoke.com/ currentissue.html

The lineup for this issue includes:

Poetry by

A.D. Winans

Tim Peeler

Robert Demaree

Louis McKee

Lyn Lifshin

Karla Huston

Donal Mahoney

Michael L. Newell

Corey Cook

Doug Draime

Sandy Benitez

M.P. Powers

Mather Schneider

Carol Lynn Grellas

Luis Berriozabal

Fiction by:

Jane Banning

Lynne Barrett

Christina Hoag

Mark Howell

Thomas Sullivan

Laura Garrison

Laurence Klavan

Michael L. Newell

Nathaniel Tower

Essays by:

Anne Woodman

Michael L. Newell

Amanda LaPergola

As always, quality stuff all around . Drop in and wallow a while in the Pig sty … it’s not a bad place to be! Thanks in advance for your support.

Poetry by

A.D. Winans

Tim Peeler

Robert Demaree

Louis McKee

Lyn Lifshin

Karla Huston

Donal Mahoney

Michael L. Newell

Corey Cook

Doug Draime

Sandy Benitez

M.P. Powers

Mather Schneider

Carol Lynn Grellas

Luis Berriozabal

Fiction by:

Jane Banning

Lynne Barrett

Christina Hoag

Mark Howell

Thomas Sullivan

Laura Garrison

Laurence Klavan

Michael L. Newell

Nathaniel Tower

Essays by:

Anne Woodman

Michael L. Newell

Amanda LaPergola

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The return of Pig in a Poke — live online today!

Posted in All posts, On writing, Pig in a Poke with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 1, 2010 by Trina

Big news today for fans of good writing!

Pig in a poke

Pig in a Poke magazine

I’m proud to announce that for the first time in decades, Pig in a Poke magazine is going to live again today, May 1st, 2010!

This was a team effort. I am happy to the second half of the team. My husband Harry Calhoun created the magazine from an earlier print version he published back in the 1980s. Then, he edited a magazine called Pig in a Poke and, when he ran short of money, its smaller, more affordably priced offshoot, Pig in a Pamphlet. (See Harry’s blog for details). This online literary journal offers what we think to be an incredible lineup of poetry and fiction, with a few essays too.

For my part, I edited the fiction and took a crash course (self taught) in Web design to create the look of the site. Harry and I worked together to develop the look we wanted … it allows you to spend time with the individual writers in their own intimate spaces. I’m really proud of what we’ve accomplished.

It’s a tribute to the quality and staying power of our writers that Harry was publishing some of them back in the 1980s … as long ago as 1982, in fact. And we have some newer talent that I think is equally impressive. And by the way, any poets or fiction writers on this mailing list are more than welcome to submit for future issues.

I hope you’ll drop by, give a read, maybe donate to the cause, and let me know what you think.

http://www.piginpoke.com/currentissue.html

The lineup for this issue includes:

Poetry by

Jim Daniels

Louis McKee

Lyn Lifshin

Howie Good

Christopher Cunningham

William Doreski

David Barker

Carol Lynn Grellas

Robin Stratton

Alan Catlin

Karla Huston

Corey Mesler

Donal Mahoney

Shirley Allard

Fiction by:

Burgess Needle

Sharmagne Leland-St. John

Daniel Davis

Marjorie Petesch

Anne Woodman

Ginny Swart

James Neenan

Essays by:

James Heller Levinson

Anne Woodman

Some well-knowns, some unknowns, but all, I assure you, quality stuff. Drop in and wallow a while in the Pig sty … it’s not a bad place to be!

Feed “the Pig” some short stories, please!

Posted in All posts, On writing, Pig in a Poke with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 10, 2010 by Trina

Fiction anyone? Where are you fiction writers? I have received only 18 short story submissions to Pig in a Poke magazine, while Harry has already reviewed about 100 poetry submissions, each containing several poems. He was so inundated that we had to temporarily close poetry submissions until May. Essays and fiction are still open.

This got me thinking: are there more poets than fiction writers? Is it simply that stories take longer to write than poems?  Or is Harry receiving more poetry due to his name recognition or the names he has lined up for the first issue?

I am happy that among the stories I received were some very outstanding pieces. I have a good mix lined up for May and June ranging from gripping heartfelt slices-of-life to period pieces and even a couple humorous ramblings. I laughed out loud reading them. Talented fiction writers are submitting, just not as numerous as our poets.

Maybe it is the money. At this time “the Pig” is not a paying market. From my own personal experience, it takes about 20 hours to bring a story from draft to the polished version that I will send to publishers. This is a large time investment for me. I do give my work away to non-paying markets occasionally, but very selectively. On the other hand, Harry can write a poem in less than an hour–much less at times. With the larger time investment in stories, maybe fiction writers want to get paid for their work and poets don’t expect payment. It is hard to make money from poetry. All of this is speculation, of course. But there is the whole starving-artist image of poets.

What are your thoughts? Can you explain the prolific poets?

A wonderful partnership

Posted in All posts, Life, On writing with tags , , , , , , on June 29, 2008 by Trina

Have you ever had a terrible day at work–one so bad that you wanted to walk away and never return? What makes that day different from any other? For a young math teacher who has difficulty dealing with unmanageable students, it is the pervasive influence of her own childhood in “The Mulberry Tree.”

I used my experiences in the classroom as the backdrop for “The Mulberry Tree,” which is in the summer 2008 issue of CHIRON REVIEW, a literary magazine published in Kansas. (For those of you who don’t live in Kansas, information to order a copy or subscription of CR is below).

And now I’ll finally get to the topic of this blog. The publication wouldn’t have happened without my husband, Harry Calhoun. When I first clicked on the CR Web site, I was less than impressed. But Harry assured me that CR is a well respected literary magazine, just not willing to spend $ on the site. Because I trust him, I submitted his favorite of my stories to CHIRON. Now that I’ve read the latest two issues I have to agree–the magazine and contributors are impressive.

Harry and I are both in the summer issue. He has two poems and two book reviews. One of his poems in CR, “My Wife as Wine,” is one of my favorites. And why not, it is about me. It is so fun to be published together. We also received our acceptance letter in the same envelope. See previous post. It has been exhilarating taking this ride together.

I got the idea for this blog when I sent out a note to a friend who wrote back and said, “Congratulations, Trina! That’s wonderful, and especially so because of the shared honor with Harry. What a wonderful partnership you two have.”

I realized that she is right. Harry and I have a wonderful partnership that goes beyond husband and wife or friendship. We have the common interest of writing and spend much of our time discussing the various projects we are working on and the intricacies of the written word. I value Harry’s opinion of my work–which occasionally leads to some heated discussions. But, Harry has never led me astray, so I listen to him. We use each other as a sounding board for ideas and for polishing our finished work. I read Harry’s monthly wine column before he posts it and he almost always incorporates my suggestions. I read the book reviews he sent to CR. I thought one of them was too harsh, so he revised it.

So the publication of “The Mulberry Tree” came about as a result of my partnership with Harry. We may never again get an acceptance in the same envelope or be published in the same issue of a literary magazine, but I will always remember this experience.

I would also like the thank the members of Raleigh Area Women Writers, who helped me improve the story from its original version.

You can subscribe to CHIRON REVIEW at:

522 E. South Ave.
St. John, KS 67576

$16/year for 4 issues.
Or you can purchase the summer issue for $7.00.
Ask for the “Triple S” discount for students, seniors and starving artists.

Lost in Translation

Posted in All posts, On writing with tags , , , , , , , , on April 20, 2008 by Trina

During a brief period when I was freelancing fulltime, I interviewed Harry Calhoun about his success as a poet and marketing writer. The interview titled ON WRITING AND POETRY: HARRY CALHOUN IN CONVERSATION ran in Thunder Sandwich in 2005. To increase my exposure as a freelancer, I also submitted the interview to ezinearticles.com. Since then, the interview has appeared on various sites about writing. I feel proud that my first, and probably last, attempt at an interview is so popular. Harry says he doesn’t mind that his words are all over the Internet. Instead he feels honored so many are taking his advice to heart. It has even been translated into Spanish.

One version on fuentebetsaida.com was obviously lost in translation. Harry and I both got such a laugh from this garbled mess that I decided to post part of it. My favorites are that Harry was a uranologist (a physicist who studies astronomy) since 1980 and I gave up an occupation as a flourishing region edifice pedagogue. Who knew?

“This is meet brilliant. The flooded discourse is incredible? I m REALLY appreciative of whatever earnestly beatific advice from a man writer.” Mark Howell, Senior Writer, Solares Hill.

Harry Calhoun s represent could materialize beside the lexicon definition for “journeyman.” Living grounds that not every writers hit to be famous or follow to digit identify of composition to be successful, Calhoun has institute regular article souvenir as a uranologist since 1980 and was a widely publicised worker article and literate essay illustrator in the 80s and 90s. In addition, he has altered a genre entrepot and a modify entrepot for the structure playing and settled genre and falsity pieces in magazines much as Thunder Sandwich and The Islander. He has been an award-winning marketing illustrator for international companies much as GE and IBM for the instance note years.

Trina comedienne is a worker illustrator and application who has feature and enjoyed much of Calhoun s work. Read the entire garbled interview on fuentebetsaida.com .

The real interview reads:
“This is just brilliant. The whole interview is incredible! I’m REALLY appreciative of some seriously good advice from a fellow writer.” Mark Howell, Senior Writer, Solares Hill

Harry Calhoun’s picture could appear beside the dictionary definition for “journeyman.” Living proof that not all writers have to be famous or stick to one type of writing to be successful, Calhoun has found frequent editorial favor as a poet since 1980 and was a widely published freelance article and literary essay writer in the 80s and 90s. In addition, he has edited a poetry magazine and a trade magazine for the housing industry and placed fiction pieces and poetry in magazines such as Thunder Sandwich and The Islander. He has been an award-winning marketing writer for multinational companies such as GE and IBM for the past twenty years. Here he is interviewed by Trina Allen in his home in North Carolina.

Trina Allen is a freelance writer and educator who has read much of Calhoun’s work.

My bio is just as funny:
I am a worker illustrator and application who gave up a occupation as a flourishing region edifice pedagogue to indite flooded time. I started the Storm of Thought Writing Center for composition and redaction hold and advice. I am currently employed on a children s new and individual brief stories. My publications allow Dana Literary Society, and Thunder Sandwich. My articles most teaching, curricular materials and presentations hit appeared in educational magazines much as Science Scope.

The bio should read:
I am a freelance writer and editor who gave up a career as a successful middle school teacher to write full time. I started the Storm of Thought Writing Center for writing and editing help and advice. I am currently working on a children’s novel and several short stories. My publications include Dana Literary Society, and Thunder Sandwich. My articles about teaching, curricular materials and presentations have appeared in educational magazines such as Science Scope.

I am grateful that Harry was willing to struggle through my first attempt at an interview and that interview helped us to get to know each other. We got married soon after. I also decided that freelancing wasn’t for me. I like the security of a steady income over the starving artist thing. Developing educational tests is a much better day job for me.