Archive for Harry Calhoun

Issue #3 of Pig in a Poke now alive and oinking!

Posted in All posts, On writing, Pig in a Poke with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on October 2, 2010 by Trina

Here we go again …

Pig in a Poke, issue #3, is live today … enjoy!

The third time’s a charm, and Pig in a Poke is charmed to be here. And we hope you’re charmed by the great lineup of poets (fiction writers and essayists) we have for you. I still can’t believe the amazing writers we’ve managed to attract, and Trina and I are grateful for that. As always, we try to put pearls of superb writing in our swinish sty. I think that once again we’ve put together a good mixture of poetry, fiction and some fine literary essays. Trina and I are proud to call this our magazine. A Pig in a Poke it is, because you might never know what you’re getting, but you know it’s going to be good.”  Harry Calhoun, editor.

Harry Calhoun, a.k.a. my husband, edits the poetry and I, a.k.a. Trina Allen, have picked out the stories and laid out the pages. The two of us have pretty much collaborated on choosing the essays.  Not only is there new talent here — new to the Pig, that is — but for this issue we asked several writers to submit stories including Christina Hoag, Lynne Barrett, Anne Woodman and Mark Howell.

I do hope you’ll drop by, give a read, spread the word, and maybe donate to the cause. Let me know what you think.

http://www.piginpoke.com/ currentissue.html

The lineup for this issue includes:

Poetry by

A.D. Winans

Tim Peeler

Robert Demaree

Louis McKee

Lyn Lifshin

Karla Huston

Donal Mahoney

Michael L. Newell

Corey Cook

Doug Draime

Sandy Benitez

M.P. Powers

Mather Schneider

Carol Lynn Grellas

Luis Berriozabal

Fiction by:

Jane Banning

Lynne Barrett

Christina Hoag

Mark Howell

Thomas Sullivan

Laura Garrison

Laurence Klavan

Michael L. Newell

Nathaniel Tower

Essays by:

Anne Woodman

Michael L. Newell

Amanda LaPergola

As always, quality stuff all around . Drop in and wallow a while in the Pig sty … it’s not a bad place to be! Thanks in advance for your support.

Poetry by

A.D. Winans

Tim Peeler

Robert Demaree

Louis McKee

Lyn Lifshin

Karla Huston

Donal Mahoney

Michael L. Newell

Corey Cook

Doug Draime

Sandy Benitez

M.P. Powers

Mather Schneider

Carol Lynn Grellas

Luis Berriozabal

Fiction by:

Jane Banning

Lynne Barrett

Christina Hoag

Mark Howell

Thomas Sullivan

Laura Garrison

Laurence Klavan

Michael L. Newell

Nathaniel Tower

Essays by:

Anne Woodman

Michael L. Newell

Amanda LaPergola

Luna Station, the Pig, and Harry Calhoun

Posted in All posts, On writing, Pig in a Poke with tags , , , , , , , , , on September 8, 2010 by Trina

Luna Station Quarterly

Read a short story based on the characters from my novel in progress on Luna Station Quarterly, a magazine focused on genre fiction as written by women. In “Payback is a bitch,” when a personal tragedy costs Detective Rosa Wolfe everything–her marriage, her career, and her badge–she returns to the streets she once patrolled, finding satisfaction in high-payoff vengeance for hire. Read more on a previous post. I am pleased that “Payback” is currently the story of the week.

Pig in a Poke

We’re ramping up for issue 3 on October 1. Harry has chosen the poems and essays. He is excited about the line up. I confess that I’ve gotten behind in replying to the story submissions writers have sent to Pig in a Poke magazine. If you sent me a story and I haven’t yet responded, I’m still considering it. I have made the choice to return to Measurement Inc as a regular Monday – Friday employee. Therefore, my time for reviewing fiction is now limited to nights and weekends. I’m wondering how I am going to get the pages up by October 1. Maybe sleep is overrated.

Any Web developers interested in converting Word documents to HTML on a nearly voluntary basis? I could use some help. Contact me if you want to be part of “the Pig.”

Meet Harry Calhoun at the NC Writers Network Raleigh Region Open Mic Night at PoetrySpark

On Sept 17 from 8-11 pm Harry will be reading some of his poetry 

Location:Isaac Hunter’s Tavern on Fayetteville Street in downtown Raleigh

Trina reads on Blink Ink Fiction

Posted in All posts, On writing, Pig in a Poke with tags , , , , , , on June 22, 2010 by Trina

On July 1 at 9 o’clock, the noted poet Lynn Alexander hosts a show on Blog Talk Radio called Blink Ink Fiction. She has invited me to read and discuss my fiction writing. Harry Calhoun and I will also be discussing Pig in a Poke magazine. Go to the Web site and find the July 1 show to listen in or participate.

And look for the second issue of Pig in a Poke magazine, live July 1. We have a line up of very talented poets and story writers. I am proud to be able to publish such exceptional work. It has been fun putting the issue together.

The return of Pig in a Poke — live online today!

Posted in All posts, On writing, Pig in a Poke with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 1, 2010 by Trina

Big news today for fans of good writing!

Pig in a poke

Pig in a Poke magazine

I’m proud to announce that for the first time in decades, Pig in a Poke magazine is going to live again today, May 1st, 2010!

This was a team effort. I am happy to the second half of the team. My husband Harry Calhoun created the magazine from an earlier print version he published back in the 1980s. Then, he edited a magazine called Pig in a Poke and, when he ran short of money, its smaller, more affordably priced offshoot, Pig in a Pamphlet. (See Harry’s blog for details). This online literary journal offers what we think to be an incredible lineup of poetry and fiction, with a few essays too.

For my part, I edited the fiction and took a crash course (self taught) in Web design to create the look of the site. Harry and I worked together to develop the look we wanted … it allows you to spend time with the individual writers in their own intimate spaces. I’m really proud of what we’ve accomplished.

It’s a tribute to the quality and staying power of our writers that Harry was publishing some of them back in the 1980s … as long ago as 1982, in fact. And we have some newer talent that I think is equally impressive. And by the way, any poets or fiction writers on this mailing list are more than welcome to submit for future issues.

I hope you’ll drop by, give a read, maybe donate to the cause, and let me know what you think.

http://www.piginpoke.com/currentissue.html

The lineup for this issue includes:

Poetry by

Jim Daniels

Louis McKee

Lyn Lifshin

Howie Good

Christopher Cunningham

William Doreski

David Barker

Carol Lynn Grellas

Robin Stratton

Alan Catlin

Karla Huston

Corey Mesler

Donal Mahoney

Shirley Allard

Fiction by:

Burgess Needle

Sharmagne Leland-St. John

Daniel Davis

Marjorie Petesch

Anne Woodman

Ginny Swart

James Neenan

Essays by:

James Heller Levinson

Anne Woodman

Some well-knowns, some unknowns, but all, I assure you, quality stuff. Drop in and wallow a while in the Pig sty … it’s not a bad place to be!

Feed “the Pig” some short stories, please!

Posted in All posts, On writing, Pig in a Poke with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 10, 2010 by Trina

Fiction anyone? Where are you fiction writers? I have received only 18 short story submissions to Pig in a Poke magazine, while Harry has already reviewed about 100 poetry submissions, each containing several poems. He was so inundated that we had to temporarily close poetry submissions until May. Essays and fiction are still open.

This got me thinking: are there more poets than fiction writers? Is it simply that stories take longer to write than poems?  Or is Harry receiving more poetry due to his name recognition or the names he has lined up for the first issue?

I am happy that among the stories I received were some very outstanding pieces. I have a good mix lined up for May and June ranging from gripping heartfelt slices-of-life to period pieces and even a couple humorous ramblings. I laughed out loud reading them. Talented fiction writers are submitting, just not as numerous as our poets.

Maybe it is the money. At this time “the Pig” is not a paying market. From my own personal experience, it takes about 20 hours to bring a story from draft to the polished version that I will send to publishers. This is a large time investment for me. I do give my work away to non-paying markets occasionally, but very selectively. On the other hand, Harry can write a poem in less than an hour–much less at times. With the larger time investment in stories, maybe fiction writers want to get paid for their work and poets don’t expect payment. It is hard to make money from poetry. All of this is speculation, of course. But there is the whole starving-artist image of poets.

What are your thoughts? Can you explain the prolific poets?

The good old summer time

Posted in All posts, Life, On writing with tags , , , , , , , , on April 1, 2010 by Trina

My short story The good old summer time is up in the April issue of  the Dead Mule.

I may not be a moonshine drinkin’, sweat-drippin’, pickup drivin’, yankee hatin’ redneck who eats greasy bacon, runny eggs fried in lard with grits, and sits on my neighbor’s sagging porch drinking beer and smoking cigars, but I like to write about them, and I do enjoy an occasional meal of shrimp and grits.

That’s only part of my southern legitimacy statement. Click on the Dead Mule link to read more. 

Harry has five poems in the April issue. The husband and wife team strikes again! The last time we were together was in Chiron Review in 2008. I saved the envelope our acceptance letters came in.

The good old summer time is set in spring, not summer. It’s about change: coping with loss, winter turning to spring. I wrote this story two years ago after my mother-in-law passed away unexpectedly. Her funeral was on the first day of spring–see my previous post: March

Because Harry’s mother had been sick for quite some time, I wondered how she could have hidden it from her family and friends. Connellsville, Pennsylvania is,  after all,  a small town. And then I realized, maybe she was aided in the deception. Perhaps the entire town played a part in the conspiracy. So the original title of The good old summer time was Conspiracy of Silence.

As stories often do, this one took a different course than I had planned. It veered from a town conspiracy to two men finding friendship through grief. Throw in a piano playing spirit and you’ve got The good old summer time.

Enjoy.

Payback is a Bitch

Posted in All posts, On writing with tags , on November 28, 2008 by Trina

Seems an unlikely post for the day after Thanksgiving, but this is the title of a story I just finished–maybe it is appropriate for Black Friday. As the title indicates, Red, A.K.A Red Riding Hood, is a hard-ass female vigilante with a coke habit. She partners with the seedy but savvy Nick the Nick in a high risk, high payoff career of vengeance for hire. I had fun writing it because Red acts on her own morals and beliefs, ignoring the law. I have a lot of freedom with her character and what she can and will do. I wrote the first draft of “Payback is a Bitch” last Friday and revised it during the week, which is why I haven’t posted–I’ve been working on the story instead. It was intended for DARK JESTERS: AN ANTHOLOGY OF HUMOROUS HORROR . It won’t work for the anthology because it’s not humorous–it’s more wry–and it exceeds the anthology’s 2000 word limit. I’ll have to find another market for it.

The story gave me idea for my next novel–a female Rambo. Rambo is a perfect example of a vigilante, which is probably why I like his character so much. So, I’m contemplating again. I’m going to keep my notes on the other novel idea I had, which was a Stephen King type detective thriller about a man who dreamed crimes into reality. I’m going to start working on the “Payback is a Bitch” novel first. I’m deciding who the POV characters will be: I already have Red, Nick the Nick, and a detective who will pursue them. I think Nick the Nick may be the main character, because he’s actually much more colorful and skilled than Red. More posts to come as I write the synopsis and get started.

BTW, Harry got me the complete collector’s set of all four Rambo movies for my birthday, which was Wednesday. We watched FIRST BLOOD and then the 2008 RAMBO Wednesday night–stayed up until midnight, which is late for us. Harry said not too many women would want to watch Rambo movies on their birthday, but I loved it.

Agent search update
I have an exclusive out for my young adult novel, so cross your fingers for me.

As I wait, I would be remiss if I didn’t mention what I have to be thankful for.

• I have a job I like, when so many people are out of work. What a difficult holiday season it must be for them, and how fortunate I am to have an employer who is willing to let me work on a flexible schedule to give me time to write.
• I have an awesome daughter, who has overcome much–I’m proud of her–and an intelligent grandson who entertains me with his curiosity.
• I have a wonderful family, Mom and sisters, who are always there for me, even when I’m lazy about keeping in touch.
• I have friends, old and new, who enrich my life.
• I have a house I love. . . and there’s no threat of foreclosure hanging over my head.
• Most importantly, I have a husband who is a great companion, loves me and supports me in everything I do.

As a side about Harry, when I volunteered to start a Web site for him, I didn’t know updating it would become a full time job–not that I’m complaining. I am both happy and excited for Harry because he has numerous publications out and forthcoming. In December alone, he has 22 poems and three essays in eight magazines, as well as a chapbook upcoming on December 23.